nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten
Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.
"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.
Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.
And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.
"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.
He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.
Continue reading.
Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.
Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.
Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.
Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

nprglobalhealth:

Ebola Is A Deadly Virus — But Doctors Say It Can Be Beaten

Saidu Kanneh was given a hero’s welcome last week when he walked into a community meeting about Ebola in a tiny village of mud huts in the Kissi Kama region of Sierra Leone. Kanneh was diagnosed with Ebola early in July, was treated for 12 days in a Doctors Without Borders hospital and overcame the disease.

"God has made me as an example to survive and then get into the community to talk to my people," says Kanneh, who’s about 40 years old and runs a health clinic near the border with Guinea and Liberia. In treating Ebola cases, he too caught the disease — he thinks he may have been infected from contact with the bodily fluids that transmit the disease, perhaps because of a gap between his rubber gloves and his shirt sleeve.

Kanneh’s message is that not every patient dies.

And there are signs of hope: changes taking place that could be key to stopping the West African outbreak that began in March and has so far seen 1,032 cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with more than 600 deaths.

"There is no cure but that does not mean we can’t treat it with success," says Tim Jagatic,a Canadian physician at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Kailahun where Kanneh was treated — a series of tents set up in a field.

He says the human body can figure out how to combat it: “This is just a virus. It’s a virus like influenza. When we have influenza we know we stay home, take our fluids and let our bodies do the rest. That’s the same thing that we are doing here.

Continue reading.

Top: Sylvester Jusu, a Red Cross volunteer, wears a suit and goggles to protect himself from contracting Ebola.

Bottom left: The burial team waits outside the house of someone who may have died of Ebola.

Bottom right: The team is sprayed with disinfectant after removing the body.

Photos by Tommy Trenchard for NPR

theweekmagazine:

Finally, you will soon be able to binge-watch all 522 episodes of The Simpsons online and on demand
You’re busy for the next 207 hours

washingtonpost:

We’re chatting with Pulitzer Prize winner and writer extraordinaire Eli Saslow about writing, reporting and overall journalisming.

Submit your questions here and Eli will answer them in real time on Tuesday, Aug. 5 at 3 p.m. Between now and then, check out some of Eli’s best work here (including the stories that won him that top prize).

“Our community has been able to come together and mobilize very quickly to provide a real and viable solution to the problem.”
mashable:

Spotted: Walder Frey (i.e. actor David Bradley) at a wedding. Luckily, it ended better than the typical Game of Thrones wedding. mashable:

Spotted: Walder Frey (i.e. actor David Bradley) at a wedding. Luckily, it ended better than the typical Game of Thrones wedding.

mashable:

Spotted: Walder Frey (i.e. actor David Bradley) at a wedding. Luckily, it ended better than the typical Game of Thrones wedding.

todaysdocument:

The Battle of Atlanta occurred 150 years ago on July 22, 1864. Fought on the outskirts of the city between Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman and Confederates under General John Bell Hood, the battle preceded a siege after which Atlanta would fall to the Union.

Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Battlefield of Atlanta, 1864, July 22, where Gen. McPherson was killed, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes
todaysdocument:

The Battle of Atlanta occurred 150 years ago on July 22, 1864. Fought on the outskirts of the city between Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman and Confederates under General John Bell Hood, the battle preceded a siege after which Atlanta would fall to the Union.

Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Battlefield of Atlanta, 1864, July 22, where Gen. McPherson was killed, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes
todaysdocument:

The Battle of Atlanta occurred 150 years ago on July 22, 1864. Fought on the outskirts of the city between Union forces under Major General William T. Sherman and Confederates under General John Bell Hood, the battle preceded a siege after which Atlanta would fall to the Union.

Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Georgia, Atlanta Battlefield, July 22, 1864, ca. 1862 - ca. 1865. From the series: Selected Views from “Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign” by George N. Barnard, Photographer, 1862 - 1865
Battlefield of Atlanta, 1864, July 22, where Gen. McPherson was killed, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. From the series: Mathew Brady Photographs of Civil War-Era Personalities and Scenes
“I don’t see any differences from the tragedy 9/11, from the tragedy of Lockerbie and from the tragedy of Grabovo.”

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko

The Netherlands is now calling the downing of MH17 a war crime

(via micdotcom)
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 
micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring


It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 
Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring

It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 

Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom